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Archiving footage from tapeless cameras

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Archiving footage from tapeless cameras
I like the specs on some of the new tapeless HDV cameras. My main concern would be how to archive raw footage. I record a lot of personal footage of my kids that I don't necessarily edit right away. I'm used to just sticking the tapes in a box. If I were to get a camera that didn't use tape, I think I'd be screwed. For those using these cameras, what is your method of archiving?
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Re: [digexpressions] Archiving footage from tapeless cameras In reply to
HDV cameras are mostly tape-based so you're probably thinking of the new crop of AVCHD cameras. The simplest way to archive such footage would be on a large hard drive, but since these can fail it's best to make a duplicate set on two separate drives. If you then get something like the Western Digital WDTV device you can play the footage from the drive to your TV to watch it, or playback on a computer.

I just bought a 1.5 TB hard drive for $113 plus tax which would hold roughly 140 hours of AVCHD footage, or more depending on the recording quality setting. So archiving isn't particularly a problem, other than the reliability of hard drives for long-term storage.

Last edited by:

KevinShaw: May 21, 2009, 6:14 AM
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Re: [digexpressions] Archiving footage from tapeless cameras In reply to
Several ways to archive...
Store on removable hard drives, but as mentioned drives can fail when not properly stored.
Record footage back to tape. Yes I did say record digital footage back to tape. This might seem stupid, but tape is still one of the best archival methods.
Burn data on DVD or BluRay media. Make sure that you use good, not cheap media, as cheap DVD's don't have the best shelf life. I have unfortunately found out first hand.

It's probably best to use 2 of the 3 methods. As it's never recommended to place all of your eggs in one basket, as redundancy is always best.
I would most likely archive footage to hard drives, as well as burn the media on Dual layer DVD or BluRay disk. It's highly unprobable, that both archival methods would fail, but anything is possible. So if let's say your hard drive fails, then you ahve the disk for backup and visa versa.

For myself and my editing anyway, I always ahve the media that I am currently editing on my system drive, and also ahve extrenal ESATA drives for backup purposes. These drives have the exact same information on them that the system drives do (media, NLE files, artwork etc.). So If I was editing with AVCHD media (which I still currently use tape), then I would archive the native fooatge on my system drive, ready for transocding when the edit needs to happen, as well as on external drive for backup purposes. I woudl also burn them to disk for additional backup. When the vidoe is finished, I would send the final edit to tape for archiving, and store on drives for additional archival. Hard drives aren't bad for storage, but you must make sure that you seal them properly and store them in a standing position, and plug them in every couple of months and let the drive spin up, and then remove it for storage. If the drive doesn't spin up for prolonged periods of time, then the drives are prone to lose the data on the disk.

Michael

Video Cameras: (2) Sony NX5U
DSLR: Canon 550D
Lens: Canon 50mm 1.8, Tamron VC 17-50mm 2.8
Software: Sony Vegas, Final Cut Studio
Computer: MAC BABY! MacPro, MacBook Pro
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Re: [MLiebergot] Archiving footage from tapeless cameras In reply to

In Reply To
Several ways to archive...
Store on removable hard drives, but as mentioned drives can fail when not properly stored.
Record footage back to tape. Yes I did say record digital footage back to tape. This might seem stupid, but tape is still one of the best archival methods.
Burn data on DVD or BluRay media. Make sure that you use good, not cheap media, as cheap DVD's don't have the best shelf life. I have unfortunately found out first hand.

It's probably best to use 2 of the 3 methods. As it's never recommended to place all of your eggs in one basket, as redundancy is always best.
I would most likely archive footage to hard drives, as well as burn the media on Dual layer DVD or BluRay disk. It's highly unprobable, that both archival methods would fail, but anything is possible. So if let's say your hard drive fails, then you ahve the disk for backup and visa versa.

For myself and my editing anyway, I always ahve the media that I am currently editing on my system drive, and also ahve extrenal ESATA drives for backup purposes. These drives have the exact same information on them that the system drives do (media, NLE files, artwork etc.). So If I was editing with AVCHD media (which I still currently use tape), then I would archive the native fooatge on my system drive, ready for transocding when the edit needs to happen, as well as on external drive for backup purposes. I woudl also burn them to disk for additional backup. When the vidoe is finished, I would send the final edit to tape for archiving, and store on drives for additional archival. Hard drives aren't bad for storage, but you must make sure that you seal them properly and store them in a standing position, and plug them in every couple of months and let the drive spin up, and then remove it for storage. If the drive doesn't spin up for prolonged periods of time, then the drives are prone to lose the data on the disk.


What Mike said has pretty much been my process for the last 2.5 years of being tapeless. I have a shelf full of HDD's that I spend a saturday once a quarter spinning up to give a workout to. HDD is the cheapest way to archive the media, but can be prone to failure. Count your blessings that AVCHD is a lot more space savvy than P2. My P2 footage takes roughly 1 gig a minute to archive if I shoot full HD.

Tim Harry
BandwagonHD
Texas
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Archiving footage from tapeless cameras