DSLRs and High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI)

This was filmed using two Canon 5D mark II DSLRs, each capturing the exact same subject via a beam splitter. The cameras are set so one records the subject overexposed, the other underexposed. After the footage has been recorded, a variety of HDR processing tools are used to to combine the video from the two cameras, yielding the clips you see above.

This can also be done with one camera such as Canon T2I with Magic Lantern.

High dynamic range imaging (HDRI) is a way to achieve a much higher contrast ratio (the range of values between light and dark areas) than normal photo techniques can typically achieve. The goal of HDRI is not to create an unnatural image, but one that accurately records the wide dynamic range of maximum black and the whitest white that occurs in one image.

For instance an image can have extreme contrast differences, but most photo and video technology cannot record these extreme differences. If you exposed for the darkest areas, you would over-expose the highlights and vice versa. Choosing what to expose properly and what to let go – ether under or overexpose is a judgement call of the photographer and is an important element of the art of photography. It applies equally to cinematography and videography.

If you took one photograph and exposed for the darkest areas and then from the same vantage point you took more photos and exposed for the lighter areas and selectively superimposed these photos into one image, you would get an image with remarkable dynamic range. So instead of allowing the windows to “blow out” or overexpose while keeping the room properly exposed, you can do both. This was the old way of doing this by combining the different shots in Photoshop or another program after the fact.

Taking different exposures with differing f-stops is called bracketing and is a time-tested technique in photography. Instead of taking three separate photos, each exposing for a different light value, today’s DSLRs can do this automatically. By taking just one shot, the camera will automatically take several different shots at different exposures.

Is it cheating? Well, perhaps in the same way that auto focus and auto iris are also cheating, not to mention all the other auto functions in today’s cameras. It’s really just another tool at your disposal.

Video

While most video camcorders cannot process multiple images for each frame, the Red camera and Arriflex have both been working on digital sensors that can capture HDR video. The operator can choose 1 to 3 stops in additional contrast range. This gives them lots more options in post for beautiful images.

In the more affordable arena, DSLRs can capture multiple images per frame if the rate is much less than 30 frames per second. Time lapse video fits that bill because it has typical frame rates of 1 frame per second and less.

As TV sets are now featuring enhanced dynamic range, it won’t be long before TV and other video applications will find it commonplace.

Keep Reading...

Changing Faces

Changing Faces

Today you can download software that uses machine learning to perform a convincing digital video face-swap. The video is called a deepfake. It can stitch the eyes of one person onto the face of another person doing lip-sync karaoke. It isn’t perfect yet, but it could fool some people. Photo fakery is certainly not new. […]

Read More

YouTube Red Ad-Free

Here’s how YouTube Red describes their new offering: Enjoy ad-free and music videos whenever you sign in to YouTube or a YouTube app—on your mobile device, desktop, or enabled TV. Save videos and songs on your mobile device to watch offline. Connect with your favorite gamers without the ads. $9.99/month 1-month free trial. While we […]

Read More
End of Green Screen

New Camera Will Mean the End of Green Screen

The Lytro Cinema camera captures all the rays of light within a scene. This may not sound unusual, but no other camera can do this. This provides enormous power to the creative process. Every pixel is captured with color properties, directional properties, and its exact placement in space. This creates video in a 3-D space […]

Read More
Flies Around Obsticles

Skydio Drone Flies Around Obstacles

The self-flying Skydio R1 drone can follow you around in a challenging environment missing overhead trees and other obsticles.

Read More




Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


  • Forbes Magazine calls VideoUniversity one of the best business-to-business sites for digital video production.
  • WINNER
    Videography Magazine's
    "Website of the Month" Award
  • WINNER
    PC Magazine Online "Best Desktop Video Site" Award
  • WINNER
    CyberFilm School's "FOUR STAR" Award